MOMENT | Summer's End


Labor Day used to be marker that ended summer. It was a period on a long glorious sentence. Then, somewhere along the line it became a semi-colon, a short pause before moving on, and now Labor Day seems more like a footnote. For many of you summer is already over because school is back in session, summer jobs concluded, vacation is a distant memory, and the Forth of July parades seem like last year. For the minority of us that don't have school in the nucleus of our lives, the few of us that get to live in the present tense of the calendar, these last days are surely the Dog Days of summer. Hot, sultry, and slow.
This weekend I'm clocking out my last days of August with family on the East Coast. This will include my first taste of white clam pizza from the New Haven institution Frank Pepe's and likely my last taste of American summer. Hope you have a great weekend, whatever kind of summer reality you're living in right now!

From now until the last day of August (Monday the 31st), enjoy 15% off everything at The Reed with the code: DOGDAYS

More happenings on Instagram >> Lizzie (@lgmettler) and The Reed (@the_reed_shop).

SCREEN | ALTHEA

Set your DVRs: the story of Althea Gibson, the unlikely queen of the segregated tennis world of the 1950s will air on Friday September 4 at 9pm on PBS. Althea Gibson is an icon, one of the great athletes of our time, and an american hero. She grew up in Harlem, the daughter of a sharecropper who migrated north, and became the first African American tennis player (not woman, but player) to play and win at Wimbledon and the U.S. Nationals (precursor of the U.S. Open). For some context, this was a full decade before Arthur Ashe. She broke down barriers like no one before her had. This looks like a great documentary, I'm setting my DVR now!

ICON | Eulalia "Sister" Bourne


A teacher and an author, a rebel and a rancher, Eulalia Bourne is an icon whose stories are so fantastic that they almost seem mythical. In the 1910s she lost her first school teaching job in Arizona because she danced the one-step (think about what would have happened if it was the two-step!). At her second teaching job at a mining camp outside of Tuscon, Bourne asked her students (who didn't speak any english) to teach her spanish even though it was illegal to speak spanish at Arizona schools at the time. She explained:

"They had a rule in Arizona at the time: no Spanish on the school ground. Not a word. I thought that was the silliest thing I ever heard. I determined that if I was to teach them, I had to be able to talk to them…[One afternoon], after the primary grades had been dismissed, I said, ‘0igan’ [Listen] I have been teaching you English all day. Now will you teach me Spanish? ‘Sure’, they said, so they began telling me the words for different things around the room. They told me about a hundred words and how they laughed when I missed one. But everyday we did that – they taught me Spanish for five minutes. It was wonderful.”

Bourne later received her BA in English with a minor in Spanish at the University of Arizona. She taught at other schools, raised cattle and built an adobe home, where in 1967 she wrote her first book, Woman in Levi’s, the first of four books. All royalties from her published work went to the Eulalia Bourne Scholarship fund at the University of Arizona. Chapters in Woman in Levi’s include: “Please Excuse the Pants,” in which she describes her choice to wear Levi’s—a decision that drew negative attention from her community.  

"I appreciated with regret the fortitude and charity it took to be friends with a nonconformist like me, a woman in Levi's… And I was not trying to make a spectacle of myself. I had nothing but business on my mind. With trade as my purpose I was not dressed to pass inspection by style-conscious bystanders. I was dressed for a long night ride in an unheated pickup. Nevertheless, there I was under the bright lights, sticking out like a finger-splint, jostling evening strollers and shocking one into ill-founded criticism.


A woman of practicality, empathy, Western pragmatism and dry humor, Eulalia Bourne was a woman who lived her life deeply and truthfully, no matter what people said or thought. 

UNIFORM | OZMA of California


Here's a new label that I'm really excited about: OZMA of California. Just launched, OZMA is an American-made collection of women's clothing that is meant to season-less. These are pieces that can be layered on top of, and worn on their own. When I met OZMA designer Heidi Baker (formerly a designer at Levi's) this week, we both immediately agreed on how tough the fashion calendar can be. Late summer? Pre-Fall? Resort? It's hard to keep up with the maniacal speed and hey, it's still really hot out (not to mention that whole Southern Hemisphere who may enjoy clothing that makes sense with their seasons as well). When we were done solving all of the fashion industry's problems (just kidding), we started going deep into Heidi's travels to Panama. Before launching OZMA with her business partner Mariah Gardner, Heidi spent about a month in Panama surfing and hiking and swaying in a hammock. She was kind enough to write a guide for The Reed about Bocas del Toro, Panama. With all that inspiration saved up from her travels and skills develeoped to live like a nomad, Heidi started designing OZMA.

What I really love about it is how it equally balances sophistication with beachiness, and how it's meant to be worn. Like really worn. There's no one that can attest to this fact more than Heidi, she goes surfing in the morning and throws an OZMA weekend dress ($120) on once her wet suit comes off. And while she's wearing it barefoot from the beach, I've worn the dress out two nights in a row to L.A. restaurants—it's versatile, comfortable, and super flattering with the softest subtle texture.

You can certainly see Heidi's Levi's background in the line, maybe not instantly with some of the more minimal pieces like the linen Apron Tanks ($112), but certainly in the washed silk bandanas ($70) that are hand-drawn from a 1930s bandana patterns.

I'm so excited that The Reed is one of the first retailers to carry OZMA! I don't have a ton of it, so quantities are super limited, but check out the goods and let me know what you think!

SCENE | Anaïs & Dax Photo Prints

Finding good art, no, finding good original art, no, actually, finding original good art at a price point that isn't outrageous, isn't always easy. I first met the L.A.-based photo duo Anaïs & Dax around a year ago. Dax is a tall burly dude who hails from Montana and Anaïs is a chic Parisian woman who loves the beach. Together they make an undeniable team that shoots for magazines like Kinfolk and Cereal (and they shot my mug once for French Glamour), as well as commercial shoots for brands like The North Face. But you can tell their passion is about capturing adventure. I'm thrilled that we have a small curation of Anaïs & Dax images on The Reed (and a few more coming soon). Prices for prints start at $175 and range from moody black and whites on top of a surf board in Venice, CA., to vibrant cacti in Marrakech. Check out their collection right here. P.S. A new batch of vintage was added to The Reed this week as well! :]

GEAR | Made in California @ The Reed

As a transplant that's lived in L.A. for almost 15 years, I've started to feel more from California than the Midwest. My roots are unwavering, but this city has definitely become my home. In homage to the Golden State, I thought it'd be fun to round up some of my favorite California labels from The Reed as summer winds down. We're offering a special discount to blog readers only (shhh!) of 20% off anything in the store through the weekend (ends Sunday 8/16). Use the code CALIFORNIA to get the deal.

Left to right, top to bottom: Lite+Cycle SPF 30 sun stick ($16); j.MASON wrap scarves ($125); Simons Finnerty Beverly Hills print ($55+); Joshu+Vela Brass Key Hook ($35); Vere Verto Mini Mox ($332); Vintage Los Angeles pennant ($32); Joshu+Vela Canvas Bote Tote ($265); Paper Chase Press x Tomboy Style custom luggage tags ($25 for set of five); Kristi Head gold and rose gold stacking rings ($170+); Mollusk beach pants ($88); Joshu+Vela olive wax utility tote ($180); Simons Finnerty Chateau Marmont print ($55+).


Keep up with other happenings on Instagram! Lizzie (@lgmettler) and The Reed (@the_reed_shop)

Q&A | Summer Brennan

Photos by Patrick O'Connor.

It's been quite a while since we had a Q&A up in these parts, and I'm so excited to get back into that groove with writer Summer Brennan—she's as adventurous and passionate as they come, and quite industrious too. Her first book, The Oyster War: The True Story of a Small Farm, Big Politics, and the Future of Wilderness in America ($18.95) comes out tomorrow and from just hearing a morsel of the story, I can not wait to get my hands on a copy! Summer tells us a little about her book below, followed by her Q&A.
SB: When I called up my old hometown newspaper in the late winter of early 2012, I wasn’t looking for a full-time job. I was just another Brooklyn-based freelance writer and thought it could be interesting to pitch them an environmental story about the nearby nature preserve in Northern California where I grew up. When I was offered a job as staff reporter instead, I thought, why not? Why not choose adventure? What I didn’t expect was to quickly become embroiled in “the oyster war,” a local controversy with national significance, in which an oyster farm was fighting to continue operating inside a national park. There were foodies on one side of the divide and environmentalists on the other; two groups I’d always identified with rather equally. The story was full of intrigue, passion, fascinating characters, farce, and even some espionage, and right away I thought it would make a great book. So for the next two and a half years I traveled back and forth from New York to California, living out of a duffel bag, crashing on couches or in a borrowed Westfalia camper van that belonged to some friends, haunting libraries, interviewing farmers and scientists and retired politicians, and spending time in nature. The result was my first book, a work of narrative nonfiction called The Oyster War: The True Story of a Small Farm, Big Politics, and the Future of Wilderness in America, which also examines broader questions of belonging and what it means to be wild. It was a great opportunity to reconnect with the outdoorsy side of myself, and resurrect my inner tomboy.


Watercolor by Summer of her gear.


If not in Brooklyn, I would live...somewhere along Tomales Bay next to Point Reyes National Seashore, or in the nearby town of Fairfax. I love those remote coastal villages, but have grown accustomed to being able to go to the grocery store or a coffee shop without having to get in a car.

My dream vacation would be to...go island hopping in a small sailboat, maybe in the South Pacific or the Caribbean, for about six months.

My current obsessions are...

Food: oysters with the perfect combination of sweetness and brine; grilled figs on whole grain toast with cream cheese and honey; basil ice cream; homemade granola from Molly Weizenberg’s recipe. Kale and baked beans with a fried egg on top – I called it my Brooklyn Cowboy Breakfast.

Music: I’ve been really feeling Nina Simone these days. She makes me want to finally get a record player.

Fashion: I’m interested in keeping it simple to preserve my energy and attention for other things. I also like the idea of a personal uniform, which for me usually means black skinny jeans with a men’s button-down or a drapey tee (tucked, and in neutral shades.) Ankle boots if it’s cold out or flat sandals if it’s hot. Also, Chucks. In a professional setting I’ll swap in a silk shirt instead of cotton, and add heels and/or a blazer.

Retail stores/brands: I’m a sucker for heritage brands and anything that comes with a lifetime guarantee, like Filson, Fjällräven or Pendleton. I have a Burberry trench from the 80s that will probably last forever. I like Acne Studios for denim and knitwear. Lately I’ve found some great basic tees and shirts from Everlane.  Rachel Comey makes the best New York City shoes, which are stylish but comfortable enough to walk in for miles. My favorite brick and mortal shops are all bookstores: I love McNally Jackson, BookCourt, Greenlight Books, Word, Three Lives, and Community Bookstore in NYC, and Point Reyes Books in California.

I channel my childhood self when I...read sci-fi or fantasy books, or visit a science museum, aquarium or planetarium.

The fictional character I most relate to is...Hermione Granger. I might as well go around with a button affixed to my person that says “ask me about S.P.E.W.” (See also: Donna Noble.)

If I had to be outdoors all day I would...be very happy about it, but would have to wear lots of a very high SPF sunscreen.

My favorite qualities in a man are...resourcefulness, loyalty, irreverence and appetite.

My favorite qualities in a woman are...passion and eccentricity.

I’m terrified of...not getting to do the things I want most.

My dream car is a...1985 navy blue Jeep Cherokee that has been magically transformed to be 100% electric.

My cocktail of choice is...champagne.

My celebrity crush is...Neil Degrasse Tyson or Jane Goodall.

My beauty product of choice is...lots of water and plenty of sleep, but fancy potions sure help. [Whispers: Dr. Hauschkaaaaaaaaa…]

My friends and I like to...meet over oysters and talk about books.

If I could go back in time for one decade it would be...to the 1910s, provided I had enough money and freedom to travel the world and write about it.

As a teenager I was totally into...going hiking and taking walks on the beach; Shakespeare; reading poems by Pablo Neruda, Mary Oliver and Rumi; writing real letters; wearing cotton dresses with hiking boots; floral prints; dressing up with my friends and going ballroom dancing.

I tend to splurge on...travel, things that are built to last, and books.

My sense of adventure...is what makes me have Tomboy Style.

SCENE | New Orleans, LA.


It was back in January when I traveled to New Orleans with some friends for a long weekend (thanks again for all the recs, by the way!). As those of you know who have been there or had the pleasure of living there, there's nowhere else like it and no way to neatly describe it. The food, the music, the parks, the pasties, the cocktails, the architecture—it's all just oozing with flavor. There's been quite a boon in terms of fashion too, lots of great boutiques that put an interesting and decidedly New Orleans edit on things.

Over at The Reed we compiled a guide that features our favorite places (with great help from New Orleans native Laura Rutledge). In addition, we've got a new limited-run Jungmaven x The Reed travel tee out! It's a navy blue buttery soft NOLA t-shirt ($39) with colors inspired by the city's flag. Have a great weekend!
 

Keep up with Lizzie (@lgmettler) and The Reed (@the_reed_shop) on Instagram!

UNIFORM | Introducing j.MASON

I'm so so so excited about the new accessories label j.MASON out of Los Angeles. Jocelyn Mason, the designer behind her eponymous label was most recently the Director of Product Development for Clare Vivier. I remember meeting her on a studio visit at Clare V. over three years ago—she showed me the ropes of monogram embossing—something that still seems like magic! Now she's out on her own with some realllllly incredible products.

From luxury handbags hand-made from vachetta leather ($599) and leather key chains ($39) made from vegetable-tanned leather to Irish linen scarf wraps ($99-$125) that come in colors from natural flax to dark indigo—everything is the perfect mix of classic with California. The leather totes and braided keychains are exquisite, but also easy to understand at first glance.

The j.MASON scarves ($99-$125) however, are insanely versatile and truly not like anything else on the market that I know of. You can wear them around your neck draped, doubled like a kerchief, wrapped like a shawl, tied as a shirt, there are probably hundreds of ways to wear these gorgeous textiles and j.MASON makes it so they'll actually stay in place with the leather ties on each side. Check out all of the new j.MASON supply at The Reed!












GUIDE | The Reed's Red-Eye Survival Guide

We've recently created something of a red-eye survival guide at The Reed. It's a packing guide and includes two playlists, one to lull you to sleep upon take off and one to gently get your energy back up when the wheels are down at your destination. Everyone is different when it comes to sleep strategies on planes. I think noise canceling headphones are invaluable, others swear by scuba-necked hoodies, and some like to sprinkle a few calming drops of lavender essential oil on a scarf and wrap up in it to get some shut eye. We'd love to hear your strategies as well. Come check out the guide here.

P.S. Next up in the guide department is New Orleans with a Jungmaven t-shirt to go with it...stay tuned!

Follow Lizzie and The Reed on Instagram for more inside scoops!

UNIFORM | The Tradlands x The Reed Safari Shirt


This shirt's origin story goes back a few years. I walked in to a lunch meeting at King's Highway in Palm Springs and my friend Kristina was wearing an oversized linen shirt. It had been washed hundreds of times, the buttons were thick, and there was a bit of fraying happening here and there—it was sooooo freaking perfect. I couldn't focus on anything but the shirt—what a perfect item to have in the hot heat of a summer day, especially in the desert. My first question: Who made it and how old was it? Gap and about 20 years old. Great, I thought. I'll never find anything like it. I combed through 1980s Banana Republic and 1990s Gap online and searched high and low, from vintage stores to eBay, and came up empty handed each time. It was destined to only live in my memory until this spring when I was talking with Tradlands' Sadie Roberts about a collaboration for The Reed, and, hel-lo, I asked if she could create a shirt inspired by this old Gap shirt. YES, she could.

We didn't want to just copy an existing shirt though, we wanted to create the best damn white linen shirt possible, and frankly, I think we did it. The Tradlands x The Reed Safari Shirt ($155) features tails that are extra long so it can be worn like a tunic—long over shorts or even as a bathing suit cover up. The buttons are thick and sturdy (and happen to be made in Chicago). The white Irish linen is so breezy and soft, but durable enough to take well to lots of wash cycles. The cut and tailoring is what makes Tradlands the best American-made women's shirt maker on the planet. But what's the best thing about The Tradlands x The Reed Safari Shirt? The oh-so-subtle YES monogram stitched to the chest in white thread.


The shirt is about saying yes to summer adventures. All of our heros that have donned white linen in the past seemed to have spent their summers doing things like writing novels while traveling the world or protesting injustices—this shirt is entirely about that summer spirit.

The shirt just launched and in celebration, we're offering free domestic shipping all week with the code YESYES. Come check out the shirt right here at The Reed!




GIVEAWAY | Grei Chambray Shirt and Canvas Tote


When it comes to the idea of investing in high quality basics I don't think there's many out there that do it as well as the New York-based and American-made label GREI. Their products are simple without being plain—utilitarian in the best sort of way—products that please with their functionality and design. One of my absolute favorite pieces of theirs is their chambray shirt ($195) which just keeps softening every time I wash it. It's so versatile and a shirt I always pack if I'm going out of town—doesn't matter where I'm going, the shirt makes sense everywhere. In addition to the shirt, their canvas bags ($145) are perfect. 

As a self-described tote addict, this bag still excites me—it might sound silly, but it's true. The construction is so solid, the handles are the perfect length and reinforced, and the sides naturally close together at the top.

We're giving away a shirt and a tote from The Reed to one lucky winner. To enter: check out The Reed on Instagram (@the_reed_shop) where we regularly announce new products and updates. Like or comment on the giveaway photo that's posted there and you're automatically entered to win! We'll choose a winner Thursday 7/23/16! Good luck!!

UNIFORM | Mohinders Shoes


You may have noticed a resurgence in huarache style shoes here and there. I distinctly remember starting to spot them in Echo Park in L.A. a few years ago or so. Now, they're a bit easier to find (especially in warmer climes), but not necessarily when it comes to a quality pair. While a pair you may pick up in a sea town on a surf trip in Mexico may be memorable, a pair from Mohinders stand apart from other woven leather shoes.
They are ethically manufactured in rural India by 2nd and 3rd generation craftsmen and women who use a very unique vegetable tanning process that uses the bark of a babul tree and the myrobalan nut. If that means nothing to you, let me tell you what it means to me: they smell amazing and you can wear these shoes with no socks without fear that an unseemly aroma might arise from your feet after walking on a hot summer day all over town.


Currently Mohinders has two styles on offer: Men's City slippers ($145) and Women's Flats ($145) with women's City Slippers on their way soon! Check out Mohinders, they're inspirational on several levels and I've been wearing the shoes for days and am really digging them!



UNIFORM | Upstate Raglans & Scarves


As a style writer and a retailer I've gotten a little frustrated over the years with how fast seasons move in fashion. The focus on what's to come always seems to trump the present, and it always felt so disjointed to me to be thinking winter in the middle of summer and vice versa. But today all that frustration melted away when my Upstate Fall/Winter 2015 order arrived for The Reed. Not only because it's sooooo awesome, but because it is totally wearable for the rest of the summer. Sundowners at the beach with the dyed (buttery soft) raglan? Check. The wool/silk blended scarf around my neck with a sundress? Yes please!

The scarves are brilliant not only because they are the perfect weight, luxuriously soft, and a great statement piece, but there are so many ways to wear them.


A few years ago an Upstate shibori-dyed kimono snuck into my closet and it's been one of my most favorite things to wear out—because it's a little loud I don't wear it regularly, but without fail, every time I wear it I get asked about it and where it's from. I'm thinking one of these pieces just might sneak into my closet as well. Check it all out right here

UNIFORM | Jungmaven Tanks


It's that time of year when our shoulders and biceps are out in the world and the one tank I've been noticing is the American-made unisex Jungmaven Tank, cut in a way where both men and women look sleek without wearing something that's skin tight. I think I especially noticed this particular tank when the photographer shooting us in Utah last week was wearing one (it was 100 degrees and we were in winter wool, so it looked like the apparel version of a tall cold glass of water). L.A.-based Jungmaven has their own great designs on offer ($48+) but there are also two Jungmaven collabs that have caught my eye:
The Poor Porker's Chicory Tank ($54), a coffee over-dye tank that's screen printed with a chicory illustration by Elizabeth Hults and The Ace Hotel's Jungmaven Tank ($60) that features an embroidered flower and cheeky slogan (F*ck It, Let's Hug). Good stuff all around. Viva la tank!